The Role of Beirut in Fostering the Syrian-Lebanese Emigrants and the Egyptian Refugees during the Revolution of ‘Urabi Pacha in 1882, according to Press Releases

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André Nassar

Abstract

The emigration movement to Egypt developed between the late medieval centuries and the Ottoman period. In the 18th century, a Christian Lebanese-Syrian colony created “commercial clusters” that linked the merchant traffic between Iran, India the Mediterranean and Europe. They were already open to the West thanks to foreign missionaries during the Ottoman era. In addition to the Muslim merchants, a colony of Christian merchants developed in the Egyptian ports of Damietta, Rosetta, and Alexandria or in Cairo, the majority of which were engaged in trade between Lebanon and Egypt, or between Egypt and the European market through the port of Livorno in Tuscany.

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Keywords

Beirut, Lebanese Immigrants, Egyptian Refugees, Urabi Pasha Revolution, Lebanon

How to Cite
Nassar, A. (2018). The Role of Beirut in Fostering the Syrian-Lebanese Emigrants and the Egyptian Refugees during the Revolution of ‘Urabi Pacha in 1882, according to Press Releases. Chronos, 31, 107–138. https://doi.org/10.31377/chr.v31i0.126
Section
Articles in Arabic